Bibliography SS106/107/108

SS106: Introduction to Irish Archaeology
Chalcolithic to Middle Bronze Age Ireland
Late Bronze Age and Iron Age Ireland
Early Medieval Ireland
Later Medieval Ireland
Post-Medieval Ireland
SS107: Archaeological Field Studies/ SS108: Data Analysis

 

SS106: Introduction to Irish Archaeology

Core texts

  • Duffy, P.J. Edwards, D. & Fitzpatrick, E. (eds.). 2001.  Gaelic Ireland: Land, lordship and settlement c.1250-1650. Four Courts Press.
  • Horning, A., Ó Baoil, R., Donnelly, C. & Logue, P. (eds.). 2007. The Post Medieval archaeology of Ireland 1550-1850. Wordwell.
  • O’Keeffe, T. 2000. Medieval Ireland: An archaeologyTempus.
  • O’Sullivan, et al. 2016. Early medieval Ireland, AD 400-1100. Royal Irish Academy.
  • Waddell, J. 2000. The Prehistoric Archaeology of Ireland. Wordwell. 

Mesolithic and Neolithic Ireland

  • Collins, T. and Coyne, F. 2006. As Old as We FeltArchaeology Ireland 20(4), 21.
  • Collins, T. and Coyne, F. 2003. Fire and Water… Early Mesolithic Cremations at Castleconnell, Co. Limerick. Archaeology Ireland 12 (2), 24-27.
  • Cooney, G. and Grogan, E. 1994. Irish prehistory: A social perspective. Wordwell.
  • Dowd, M. 2016. A remarkable cave discovery, Archaeology Ireland 30 (2), 21-25.
  • Hensey, R. 2015. First Light: The origins of Newgrange. Oxbow.
  • Jones, C. 2007. Temples of stone: Exploring the megalithic tombs of Ireland. The Collins Press.
  • O’Kelly, C. and O’Kelly, M. 1982. Newgrange: Archaeology, art and legend. Thames and Hudson.
  • Smyth, J. 2013. Tides of change? The house through the Irish Neolithic. In: Hofmann, D; Smyth, J (eds.), Tracking the Neolithic house in Europe: Sedentism, architecture and practice. Springer.
  • Walsh, F. 2006. Neolithic Monanny, County Monaghan. In O’Sullivan, J. and Stanley, M. (eds.), Settlement, industry and ritual (Archaeology and the National Roads Authority, Monograph Series 3), Wordwell.
  • Woodman, P.C. 2015. Ireland’s first settlers: time and the Mesolithic. Oxbow.

Chalcolithic to Middle Bronze Age Ireland

Late Bronze Age and Iron Age Ireland

  • Becker, K., Ó Néill, J. and O’Flynn, L. 2008. Iron Age Ireland: Finding an invisible people. Report to the Heritage Council.
  • Cahill, M. 2001. Unspooling the mystery. Archaeology Ireland 15 (3), 8-15.
  • Cahill, M. 2005. Cuirass to gorget? An interpretation of the structure and decorative elements of some gold ornaments from the Irish Late Bronze Age. Archaeology Ireland 19 (4), 26-30.
  • Cahill Wilson, J. 2014. Late Iron Age and ‘Roman’ Ireland: Discovery Programme Reports 8. Wordwell.
  • Champion, T. 1982. The myth of Iron Age invasions in Ireland. In B.G. Scott (ed.), Studies on Early Ireland: essays in honour of M.V. Duignan, Belfast, 39-44.
  • Downey, L. Synnott, C., Kelly E.P. and Stanton, C. 2006. Bog butter: Dating profile and location. Archaeology Ireland 20 (1), 32-34.
  • Kelly, E.P. 2006. Kingship and sacrifice: Iron Age bog bodies and boundaries. Archaeology Ireland, Heritage Guide No. 35.
  • Mallory, J. 1984. The origins of the Irish. Journal of Irish Archaeology 2, 65-9.
  • McDermott, and Moore, C. 2010. Corlea Trackway: Iron Age roads in the County Longford peatlands. Archaeology Ireland, Heritage Guide No. 50.
  • Newman, C. et al. 1998. Reflections on the making of a royal site in early Ireland. World Archaeology 30, 127-141.
  • O’Brien, W. 2016. Clashanimud and the Bronze Age hillforts of Munster. Emania 23, 5-30.
  • O’Sullivan, M. and Downey, L. 2013. Hilltop forts and enclosures. Archaeology Ireland 27 (1), 2-25.
  • Raftery, B. 1994. Pagan Celtic Ireland: The enigma of the Irish Iron Age. Thames & Hudson.
  • Schot, R., Newman, C. andBhreathnach, E. (eds.) 2011. Landscapes of cult and kingship. Four Courts Press.
  • Waddell, J. 2000.The prehistoric archaeology of Ireland. Wordwell.

Early Medieval Ireland

  • Doherty, C. 1985. The monastic town in early medieval Ireland. In Clarke, H.B. and Simms, A. (eds.), The comparative history of urban origins in non-Roman Europe, B.A.R. Brit. Ser. 255, 45-75.
  • Early Medieval Archaeology Project reports page: http://www.emap.ie/emap_reports.html
  • Edwards, N. 1998. The archaeology of early medieval Ireland. Routledge.
  • Fredengren, C. 2002. Crannogs: A study of people’s interaction with lakes, with particular reference to Lough Gara in the north-west of Ireland. Wordwell.
  • Hencken, H., Price L. and Start L.E. 1950/1951. Lagore Crannog: An Irish royal residence of the 7th to 10th centuries A.D. Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 53C, 1-247.
  • Henry, F. 1965. Irish art in the early Christian period to AD 800. Meuthen.
  • Hughes, K. and Hamlin, A. 1977. The modern traveller to the early Irish church. S.P.C.K.
  • Kelly, F. 1995. A guide to early Irish law. Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies.
  • Leask, H. G. 1977. Irish churches and monastic buildings: the first phases and the Romanesque. Vol. 1. Dún Dalgan Press.
  • McManus, D. 1991. A guide to Ogham. Maynooth Monographs 4.
  • Ó Carragáin, T. 2003. The architectural setting of the cult of relics in early medieval Ireland. The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland 133, 130-176.
  • Ó Carragáin, T. 2010. Churches in early medieval Ireland: Architecture, ritual and memory. Yale University Press.
  • Ó Cróinín, D. 1995. Early medieval Ireland 400-1200. Pearson Longman.
  • O’Sullivan, et al. 2016. Early medieval Ireland, AD 400-1100. Royal Irish Academy.
  • Wallace, P.F. 2015. Viking Dublin: The Wood Quay excavations. Irish Academic Press.

Later Medieval Ireland

Post-Medieval Ireland

SS107: Archaeological Field Studies/ SS108: Data Analysis